Lazy Nutrition

If I’m going to be trapped in this body for awhile then I should try to keep it running properly. With a bad diet comes aches, lethargy and possibly premature death(might not be a bad thing). A diet consisting of mostly plant based foods is the ideal way to eat for optimum health and just like with most things in life there’s always a drawback. Fruits and vegetables are good for you but they are not as fun as french fries with gravy, doughnuts, cake, pie, danishes or chocolate hedgehogs.

As much as I like smooth bowel movements and antioxidants, eating vegetables often feels like a chore. They don’t taste that good. Some people will say vegetables are delicious but that’s only after cooking and pouring sauce over them. The main attraction on the dinner table is never green and vitamin rich. You don’t impress anyone by inviting them to a gourmet broccoli dinner. Salads come at the beginning of the meal because you want to get it out of the way…it’s like finishing your homework before you can get dessert and can go out to play. People like the mood to have an upward trajectory.

Soups are a very efficient method for getting sufficient nutrients. You chop everything up, throw it in a pot and you’re set for a few days. With big supermarkets and small produce stores discounting the prices of almost expired vegetables you can brew up a big pot of soup for cheap.

Today’s special consists of pork neck bones, head of cauliflower, leek, celery root, celery sticks, carrots, brown turnip, radishes, mushrooms, red pepper. I couldn’t even fit all of the vegetables in the bowl! I believe if I didn’t dice them all up they wouldn’t have fit in the pot. I should have added some spices and herbs.

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This post may save your life or at least your digestive system.

 

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8 comments on “Lazy Nutrition

  1. Mr.Johnsons' Unhealthy Cousin says:

    This video says it all https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=c6Kj17oVHAk

    Like

  2. You’re off to a good start, but don’t give up the desserts yet. Yours sounds like my “everything in the refrigerator soup.”. “Everything in the refrigerator stew” is thicker, having carbohydrates like potatoes, brown rice, or beans. I sometimes add cheese to enhance flavor.

    Grains–like rice or barley–and beans provide “protein complementarity” to your vegetables. This means that together they provide complete essential amino acids that pure vegetarians sometimes lack. Meat eaters and those who eat dairy and eggs don’t have to worry about getting enough protein. Eggs are the most complete protein source known.

    Liked by 1 person

    • MrJohnson says:

      I was thinking of adding beans or lentils next time. I didn’t want to add any starches because I wanted the soup to be low carb..haha.. I’ve been a proponent of eggs but didn’t know they were the most complete protein source known. For a few years I ate 16 medium boiled eggs a week. When I told the nutritionist she freaked out but measured my cholesterol levels as normal. I stopped believing in the dangers of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat. Eggs are the one food I wouldn’t want to give up because of their nutrition and versatility.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Maybe you have a future as a chef. I love lentils, and they cook fast. All beans have carbohydrates, but complex carbs are good for you, despite modern hype. The normal diet is supposed to be 60% complex carbs. “Complex” generally means they do not contain added sugar.

        Nutrition books I’ve read, like “Diet for a Small Planet” and Deepak Chopra’s “What Are You Hungry For?”, say Americans eat way more protein than they need. Both say we eat too much animal protein and that Western meat consumption is a major cause of world hunger. Something like 70 percent of produce–like corn and soy–goes to feeding livestock. Now we have corn feeding cars, too, which can only exacerbate worldwide starvation.

        Liked by 1 person

        • MrJohnson says:

          I think the only type of chef I’d ever want to be is at a soup kitchen for homeless people. For quite a while I was on a diet of primarily fruit, steamed vegetables and baked meat. Although I liked how it made me feel and look it’s not a sustainable diet in our times. Now I eat mostly whatever I want and if I overindulge I just starve or eat fruit for dinner. I would like to incorporate meatless days because like you said, we eat too much meat. Apparently cow farts are a major contributor to climate change. I don’t know, there’s a lot of shocking data out there regarding corn and agriculture. Not sure how accurate or significant they all are.

          Liked by 1 person

          • The corn/agriculture story is long and involved, which is why the ethanol mandate has slipped past people’s radar. The climate change issue is also involved, and there’s more to it than CO2 and methane. Cow farts are pure methane (which is also natural gas), but so are human farts. All decaying organic matter produces methane and CO2. It’s part of the natural life cycle.

            Sounds like you eat as well as, and with more awareness, than most people I know.

            Liked by 1 person

            • MrJohnson says:

              Natural gas? There’s definitely a joke somewhere there.

              Eating consciously has changed my life for the better. It’s been a spiritual experience I guess you can say. Y’know that mind/body thing.

              Liked by 1 person

            • The sad joke is that most people don’t know that methane and natural gas are the same thing, both CH4 molecules. That’s why I believe “climate change” is way more involved than people understand. Blame the fact that few people understand even the basics of science. This includes the media regarding climate change. The way it’s presented, it is a political issue, not a scientific one.

              Glad you are eating consciously. I hope more people will learn to appreciate the value, including cost savings, of good nutrition.

              Liked by 1 person

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